SANTA’S COMING TO CROCTALK DEC 6-7th

https://smartbetty.com/index.php/frontend/campaigns/single/5801/Exclusive-CrocTalk-Tour-and-Unforgettable-Santa-Picture-Dec-6-and-7-ONLY This will be the most unique Santa photo you’ve ever had.  Exclusive to Smart Betty, you get a tour of the Croc Talk Conservatory & Rescue Reptile Facility and a picture taken with Santa and one of your favourite reptiles.   For a one-of-a-kind educational experience, visit CrocTalk, a conservation facility that showcases prehistoric replicas of the SuperCroc plus live Crocodilians, Sulcata Tortoises, Bearded Dragons, 3 Little Pigs and more.  Visitors of all ages have the opportunity to feel a live crocodile!  CrocTalk has a perfect safety record so come on down, share some fun and you’ll take home great memories. That’s no “Croc”!215766_1021267646978_33_n

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SuperCroc Skulls Bite Big at CrocTalk Zoo

photo-4.jpgphoto 1CrocTalk Conservation was the first facility in Canada to purchase the reproductions of The SuperCroc Skulls in 2006 from Dr Paul Sereno and Project Exploration in Chicago. With the investment from one of our very supportive and “dedicated to our cause” investors, my partner Brenda Bruce and myself were able to add this one of a kind attraction to our crocodilian educational program which has captivated minds of many thousands of our guests here at the now CrocTalk Zoo Society, in Kelowna BC.

In 2009, the Alberta’s Royal Tyrrell Museum also purchased the cast to include in an exhibit on fossils marking the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin’s The Origin of Species.  

This monster crocodile lived about 110 million years ago and was approximently 40ft long with a weight of 8-10 tons. Not something you want to see when you open your bedroom window in the morning!

The SuperCroc skulls and the infamous McGator family here at CrocTalk Zoo Society has attracted interested guests from all over the world to the Okanagan and continue to be a major attraction in British Columbia.

Other animals include of course the McGators, Alli, Lucy, Lucky and Later McGator! Alli McGator of course is the American Alligator that’s 8.5 ft long and 350 lbs. who you’ll witness respond to commands, come, back, stay, stop and no! The continued study and research I do with these incredible reptiles continues daily.

Other animals including our 6 species of crocodilians, 10 species of tortoises and turtles, bearded dragons, tarantulas, anphibians and lizards. Also many static exhibits including the skull of Gavialosuchus, the largest crocodilian skull found in one piece! “Mrs”, our interactive turkey and of course my newly acquired 3 Little Pot bellied Pigs, Larry, Moe and Curly! Such a joy to witness pushing and playing with their coloured balls and their entertaining antics daily. Never a dull moment round here.

The recent filming of a documentary with The Photo Warrior, and the PBS filming for KSPS Public TV in Spokane Wa. has all be very rewarding and makes for a very busy season with international tourists local and abroad.

CrocTalk Zoo Society is in the exciting relocation process to a much needed larger facility accommodating bus tours and larger numbers of guests and larger environments for our crocodiles, and welcomes any interested investment inquiries. Donations greatly appreciated and the opportunity to “Adopt and Animal” from the website are available (www.croctalk.com) and to be honest, necessary to continue with our “high quality” captive care that our animals deserve and are accustomed to receiving. Without the help of CrocTalk’s dedicated followers we would not be able to continue with our exciting educational programs here in Kelowna and the Okanagan, so a VERY BIG THANK YOU to you all! Let’s keep the Dream Alive!

“We can do Together what I Can’t do by Myself!” and remember that “Crocs Need Love Too!” 

For Info please contact:

Doug Illman

Director of Operations, CrocTalk Zoo 

email: were@croctalk.com

Ph: 250-717-6060 or CrocTalk Zoo 250-764-1616

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GREAT NEWS KELOWNA!

GREAT NEWS KELOWNA! CrocTalk Zoo Society was officially incorporated under the Society Act on March 12, 2014, at 3:42 PM, Pacific Time. Now lets work together to create an incredible educational, entertaining attraction and Zoo facility in Kelowna for All to enjoy and be proud of!
We are looking for a permanent location NOW close to hwy or on hwy. I’ve always promised becoming a Non Profit Organization now it’s reality. Please help CrocTalk Zoo Society to it’s final permanent location here in Kelowna. Thank You Kelowna for your patience and support!Image

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Good Zoo Presence

At CrocTalk Zoo we promote Life rather than Death, Educational rather than Exploitation, we promote the Banning of Animal Skins and Furs rather than I Want One, the Best Health Care possible rather than Good Enough and we promote Healthy Diet rather than Anything Will Do. WE promote Good Mental Health rather than What’s That? Finally CrocTalk promotes a Stress Free Safe Environment rather than Who Cares! We are active daily providing these necessary services for all our animals.

What separates CrocTalk Zoo from some others? Government permits and licensing ( MFLNRO CAS Permit, also RDCO Recognized Facility Status written into the City of Kelowna ByLaws)

CrocTalk Zoo is Qualified and is now registered as a Not for Profit Society, as I’ve always promised I would do.

The CrocTalk Zoo Society needs your support. ADOPT an ANIMAL at http://www.croctalk.com and get some fun REWARDS too!

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Are Animal Rights Activists Hypocrites?

I had a wonderful conversation with a good friend yesterday morning. We talked about the hypocrisy surrounding animal rights groups and animal lovers and supporters in general. Thought I’d share it with you all. I’ve hesitated to write this for fear of upsetting some but realized it’s the truth and must be addressed before it’s too late! I don’t mean to bring up any personal issues you may have but I’m just sharing our conversation (with his permission)

First of all What is CrocTalk?

ImageAt CrocTalk Zoo we promote Life rather than Death, Educational rather than Exploitation, we promote the Banning of Animal Skins and Furs rather than I Want One, the Best Health Care possible rather than Good Enough and we promote Healthy Diet rather than Anything Will Do. WE promote Good Mental Health rather than What’s That? Finally CrocTalk promotes a Stress Free Safe Environment rather than Who Cares! We are active daily providing these necessary services for all our animals.

What separates CrocTalk Zoo from some others? Government permits and licensing (MOE CAS Permit and our MFLNRO Zoo Permit, also RDCO Recognized Facility Status written into the City of Kelowna ByLaws)

CrocTalk Zoo is Qualified and has now registered as a Not for Profit Society…as I’ve always promised I would do.

The CrocTalk Zoo Society.

Now this:

According to Dictionary.com, a hypocrite is “a person who pretends to have virtues, moral or religious beliefs, principles, etc., that he or she does not actually possess.”

So, when referring to those of us who support animal rights, does this mean one is a hypocrite that can choose what animal has that “right to life” and what other animal doesn’t? Does that animal not have the same rights as the other? To live a safe comforted life in a loving home (if domestic) or a reptile to be cared for lovingly in a captive home or prohibited reptiles kept in professional and licensed zoos?

Just saying…

Because an animal has soft fur, floppy ears, sleeps on your bed, sits on your lap or gets your slippers does that animal have more rights to live a satisfying and protected life any more than an animal that has scales or hard smooth skin or hide? Like maybe crocodilians including alligators, crocodiles or caimans or even other species of reptiles?

Question:

Why do animal rights lovers/supporter’s in Kelowna for example, only financially donate to their local shelters, who do wonderful work, by the way, rescuing dogs, cats, bunnies, birds and are lucky enough to be able to adopt them back into the community through good homes?

Why is it that these individuals don’t care to financially support to their local (licensed by the province) zoo that does the same thing?

Are these good people examples of hypocrite’s when only supporting animals they only prefer to support because of attractability or they don’t approve of animals in captivity?

How can one say they love and support all animals and protect the rights of all animals yet only financially support facilities that rescue dogs, cats, bunnies, and maybe some horses form time to time and will not support their local zoo that focuses on rescuing crocodilians that are beaten, starved, and kept in grow opps, drug houses and incredibly abusive environments? Do these animals not deserve the same support as a dog or cat rescue facility? Does this mean people who support one but never the other are examples of being hypocrites? Do they still have the right to call themselves supporters of animal rights when only certain species are important to them? We all have to right to support whoever we wish to support I realize but then don’t call yourselves “animal rights activists” if you don’t financially support all rescue facilities that do wonderful work on behalf of their animals rights. It’s a tough job maintaining housing and good captive care for all animals in captivity and very very expensive. We all want to be part of the solution and not be part of the problem I know. But denying the captive rights of some species while only supporting the facilities that don’t even need the help is being a hypocrite regardless of whether or not they are warm and fuzzy compared to cold blooded and dangerous.

Rescued crocodilians also deserve a good life free from starvation, neglect, bodies used as ashtrays, physical abuse and kept in horrendous environments. Remember these animals in particular cannot be adopted to good homes because they are illegal. Also many cannot be put into the wild as many suggest because of the fact they are born in captivity and have extenuating health issues. Their life expectancy would be cut very short.

Question, often asked is “why do you rescue them here in Kelowna? Crocodiles, alligators don’t live here!” Zoos and aquariums are filled with animals, that are not indigenous to that zoo’s geographical location such as these and thus used as educational tools to educate the public of their incredible capabilities regarding purpose and biology. Many animals, most patrons would never see or experience again in their lifetime expect to gain knowledge from a zoo or aquarium. Remember education starts at home and zoos are a great tool if you are one of the few fortunate enough in having a zoo in your community. They must be supported to succeed in the wonderful work that all licensed zoos and aquariums do….just my thought

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Dreams Become Reality!

Just a thought….ImageWhen there’s a strong desire within you to express or create something, know that this feeling is of Universal in making. Your longing is your calling— and no matter what it is, if you go with it, you’ll be guided, guarded, and assured of success. When a purpose or path is laid before you, you have the choice to just “trust the process” and let it flow, or remain stuck in fear. Trusting the perfection that resides within you is the key…NEVER GIVE UP!

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“Living in Harmony?”

Image“Living in Harmony” seems to be on my mind lately. I see whats happening in the world today, everywhere when we don’t live together in “harmony”. Mandela defined harmony and lived his life accordingly to try to make lives better for all races. Living in Harmony, means co-operation, respecting one another no matter what their beliefs and doing our part in making our environments cleaner, respecting wildlife and bagging garbage and not throwing it our of your vehicle window like I witnessed here in Kelowna recently. I stopped and picked up the garbage. When was the last time you improved your environment. Hug your pets, your kids, recycled, hugged your partner, sex is irrelevant, told your parents or mate you loved them…whatever it takes to do something to make anthers’ life more bare able in the un-harmonized society we live in today. I don’t mean to sound preachy, but change won’t happen unless we make it happen. Harmonize. Like this picture where there is Harmony. The crocodile allows this little bird to help clean his teeth rather than kill it and eat it. That’s Harmony!  Just my thought….

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Crocodiles Using Tools?

ImageA blog article over at Tetrapod Zoology (a site that you should bookmark and read regularly if you’re not doing so already, because it’s rather good) is running a story about tool use in crocodiles and alligators. Yes, that’s right, tool use. We know that crocs are much smarter than people give them credit for, but are they really capable of using tools as well?

The article references a paper that’s just been published digitally by Dinets et al (2013). They describe mugger crocodiles at the Madras Crocodile Bank appearing to balance sticks on their snout and sitting under nesting egret colonies. Egrets use sticks to build their nests, so they spot some floating in the water, land next to them, and get a nasty shock when they try and pick one up. The paper describes this as a deliberate attempt by the crocodiles to mislead the egrets into landing within striking range, with the sticks as the tools in the ruse. It’s a compelling idea.

Seeing crocodiles with sticks, leaves and other vegetation balanced on their head isn’t new, we’ve all seen them doing it. We have a large saltwater crocodile who lives in a pool covered with Fistia spp, an aquatic plant that makes a fetching hat when he surfaces underneath one. I suspect many of us have wondered whether this plays any kind of functional role, or whether it’s simply the crocodile not caring either way whether it has plants on its head. I’ve seen crocodiles surface in such dense vegetation that they can’t actually see, and shake their head to clear them off. Other times they seem to sit quite happily without apparently noticing. If you were a bird and saw a nice bit of vegetation and didn’t recognise what was underneath it, you might think that crocodiles could learn to use this vegetation to increase their chances of catching prey. It’s certainly feasible, but proving it is another matter entirely.

The Dinets et al. study suggests that mugger crocodiles only balance sticks on their head and sit under egret colonies during egret breeding season. This certainly supports the idea that something deliberate is going on, although it’s still possible that it’s incidental; perhaps the crocodiles spend more time sitting under egret colonies during egret breeding season, and those that have sticks on their heads might get lucky when an egret gets fooled? To counter this, the authors point out that the area around the egret colony doesn’t have many sticks, suggesting that the crocodiles must bring them across to the colony for them to use as bait. Even if it is purely coincidental at first, crocs learn fast, and this might reinforce behaviour that makes sitting under a nesting egret colony with sticks on your head more likely.

I think it’s a great observation, even though there’s still a skeptical part of my brain wondering whether there might be another explanation. I’d love to see more work done on this, because a study like this opens up a whole set of really interesting questions. Science! What is true, though, is that crocodiles do some amazing and unexpected things, and it wouldn’t surprise me if they were this cunning. We know that they’re capable of it.

Dinets, V., Brueggen, J.C. & Brueggen, J.D., 2013. Crocodilians use tools for hunting. Ethology Ecology and Evolution, in press. doi.org/10.1080/03949370.2013.858276

 
POSTED BY AT 3:54 PM
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Any man can be a Father but it takes a REAL MAN to be a Dad!

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Memories of our family and childhood are what shape our personality and who we are. Whether we like it or not, our personality is formed by our parents, brothers, sisters, and the environment that we grew up in. For some interacting with their family feels like more bother than it is worth. They cut off ties with their families and make up pseudo families made up of chosen friends. This is OK as long as we realize that our past continues to affect who we are. We can only grow as people when we choose to confront our past. Only then can we move forward in our life.

I choose to Appreciate my past and those in it.

This ones for my Dad on his Birthday, November 25th. (died Oct 27th/10)

A warm kind passionate seeker of life, knowledge, a new restaurant, a good book, a good joke and always looking for an innovative way to keep his car clean! He devoted himself to caring for Mom as well. Her stability and care after his passing was first and foremost in his mind and financial affairs. This was a man of intense integrity, pride, strength and discipline.

My Dad was a good father, understanding yet still open minded as best he could without compromising his beliefs’. He taught my sister and I to not take what we had for granted and the importance of education and seeing the value in everything around us.

This man led by example and was well respected in his community. Being in the media business all his life he was a celebrity but never let it get to his head. Always humble and valued his loyalty to others and the loyalty of his friends. He was a Father us kids could go to when things went wrong.

My Father at times sacrificed his own comfort for his fatherly duties no matter how difficult it seemed. He would address the situation anyway.

Dad was a gentle man with the strength to provide the security and necessities for his family without hesitating to put his own safety on the line to protect his family.

This is how he taught us the importance of personal sacrifice.

Dads’ greatest quality was his unconditional love for his family. I miss that love and can only pray that I can be half the man he was.

I miss you Dad. I love you…thinking of you on your birthday!

Your Son

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Lucy McGator Study

At CrocTalk Conservation and Rescue I study the ability of an American Alligator to respond to simple commands. Come, back, stay, stop, down, up and of course, no. Also their ability to seemingly create a bond and my observations that prove it. So much more. In this clip Lucy McGator who is about 500 lbs(ish) and almost 11′ long, also has a jaw bite pressure of about 1500 lbs PSI. Lucy will come out of the water as I instruct her to and will take any food out of my hand showing that they can actually make a conscious choice. Taking the small piece of meat rather than the big piece of meat (me) as they have practiced for some 200 Million Years. This shows us they actually use that cerebral cortex in their brain which gives them the ability to remember, choose, think and relate to events repetitively…enjoy

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